Headache Care.net

Site updated at Thursday, 02 July 2015

Headache Care

Hypertension Symptoms

People with primary (essential) high blood pressure usually do not have any symptoms. Most people with high blood pressure feel fine and only find out they have high blood pressure during a routine exam or a doctor visit for another problem. Very severe high blood pressure (160 over 100 or higher), especially if your blood pressure rises very high quickly, may lead to hypertensive crisis. Symptoms of very severe high blood pressure include:
  1. Headaches, especially pulsating headaches behind the eyes that occur early in the morning
  2. Visual disturbances
  3. Nausea and vomiting
Over time, untreated high blood pressure can damage organs, such as the heart, kidneys, or eyes. This may lead to:

Have a Question !

Headache - Causes for Concern

Headache - Causes for Concern

The physician should be especially concerned if the patient has any of the following (Silberstein, 1992; Edmeads, 1988):

  • a new-onset headache in a patient over the age of 50;
  • a sudden-onset headache;
  • a headache that is subacute in onset and gets progressively worse over days or weeks;
  • a headache associated with fever, nausea, and vomiting that cannot be explained by a systemic illness;
  • a headache associated with focal neurologic symptoms or signs, such as papilledema, changes in consciousness or cognition (such as difficulty in reading, writing, or thinking), or a stiff neck (other than the typical aura of migraine);
  • no obvious identifiable headache etiology; and
  • a new-onset headache in a patient with cancer or human immunodeficiency virus.
If a cause for concern exists, neurologic consultation, neuroimaging studies (magnetic resonance imaging or computerized axial tomography), or lumbar puncture may be indicated. ... read more »



General rules for headache classification

General rules for headache classification

  • If the patient has more than one headache disorder, all should be diagnosed in the order of importance indicated by the patient.
  • To make a diagnosis, all letter headings of a set of diagnostic criteria must be fulfilled.
  • After each diagnosis, add estimated number of headache days per year in brackets.
  • Diagnostic criteria given at the one- or two-digit level must generally be met by the subforms, but exceptions and/or more specific criteria are listed under the subforms.
... read more »